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Campus murder of Mervo teenager shocks many

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BALTIMORE — The new school year is only a week old.

Already, two Baltimore-area students have been killed by gun violence.

They both happened on the same day – Friday.

AFTER: Police identify student shot dead by teen from another school during dismissal from Mervo High

17-year-old Mervo High student Jeremiah Brogden was shot dead outside school when he was fired. He died in hospital.

Then, later that night, a 14-year-old was killed following a football match at Milford Mill.

Teacher speaks out on death of Baltimore teenager

Relatives of Brogden told WMAR-2 News that he is a son, an athlete, a big brother and a young father.

He was shot as he was leaving school by a teenager from another Baltimore City school who was waiting in the schoolyard with a gun.

READ MORE: Police identify student shot dead by teen from another school during dismissal from Mervo High

Two teenagers killed within hours of each other

Now those who knew Brogden are heartbroken.

I’ve spoken with people close to the teenager who describe him as a light removed from their lives far too soon.

“I don’t know any other way to explain it, it just broke me where I was,” said Lenise White, director of operations at Baltimore College School for Boys.

Baltimore school mourns the death of a teenager

Before Brogden transferred to Mervo High, he was a student at Baltimore Collegiate School for Boys – a school aimed at preparing young men across the city before they headed off to high school.

AFTER: Two teenagers killed within hours of each other

Brogden played basketball there for coach Evan Singleton.

“It was shocking on so many levels, still being processed,” Singleton said. “I don’t know if it has completely affected me yet. I think of his friends, his little brother, the people who spoke to him every day.

Teenager killed in shooting last week in Mervo

Lenise White was like a school mom at Baltimore Collegiate School for Boys.

She told WMAR-2 News that receiving the news of Brogden’s death felt like she had personally lost her own son. “I couldn’t talk to the students I was with without crying,” White said.

White said Brogden was always silly and playful, but respectful.

“He was very compassionate and helpful and he was a very strong leader even at his age,” White said.

Singleton added that Brogden was a leader and came to school ready to learn.

“People wanted to be like Jeremiah,” Singleton said. “They wanted to do, he wanted to do. They wanted to wear the clothes he was wearing. One thing about him, he came to school every day in his shirt and tie and was ready to learn.

White accepted.

“He was very compassionate and helpful and he was a very strong leader even at his age,” White said.

Singleton said Brogden, a junior from Mervo High, had a God-given ability both in the classroom and on the field.

He was a running back on the football team at Mervo High.

“He was one of the smartest kids I’ve ever met in terms of knowing how to navigate the world,” Singleton said. “He was wise beyond his years.”

As gun violence plagues the city of Baltimore, especially among youth and schools, Barney Wilson, principal of the Baltimore Collegiate School for Boys, said it’s a heavy burden to bear, but it’s the young people who see it at eye level that are worth it.

“Even without our own sadness, our work is still there,” Wilson said. “We still have to motivate, inspire, give hope that there is a future and we just hope that our boys and our girls can have a future. We would like this senseless slaughter to stop.

Although they have just returned to school, it has already been an intense week for the students of Mervo.

Thus, the district declared Tuesday, September 6 to begin “recovery week” for high school.

While the staff returns at normal time, the students are invited to lunch at 11 a.m. where the school will host grade-level counseling centers from noon to 2:30 p.m.

On Wednesday, the school will have a staggered opening with seniors reporting to class at 7:45 a.m., juniors at 9 a.m. and freshmen and sophomores at 10 a.m.